Drybrook Inn - around 1850 (General)

by Derek Bond @, Cheltenham, Saturday, January 30, 2021, 18:31 (311 days ago)

On the 1851 census for the parish of Walford, Herefordshire, one of the entries is for the residents of Drybrook Inn. I have searched for that inn but cannot locate it. It might have changed its name and, by now, might not exist. Can anyone throw any light on the matter ? Entries a little earlier in the census include Bishops Wood (or road) and then a laundry. After the inn entries include 3 properties in Drybrook and then Yew Tree. This is the link to the image on Ancestry for anyone who has a subscription to it: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageviewer/collections/8860/images/HEFHO107_1976_1976-0756?...

Drybrook Inn - around 1850

by probinson @, S. Oxon, Saturday, January 30, 2021, 22:09 (311 days ago) @ Derek Bond

I don't know exactly which building but this shows the general area. Not sure if you already have that.

https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=17&lat=51.86338&lon=-2.59275&layers=1...

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Peter

Drybrook Inn - around 1850

by probinson @, S. Oxon, Sunday, January 31, 2021, 11:31 (310 days ago) @ probinson

There's a quirk of the map I linked to that is helpful. Not sure why but if you use the transparency control and set it to 50%, a third map appears and this map shows the Laundry. It's the building on the South side of the road about half way between Bishopswood and Drybrook.

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Peter

Drybrook Inn - around 1850

by Derek Bond @, Cheltenham, Sunday, January 31, 2021, 12:01 (310 days ago) @ probinson

Thanks - yes I too noticed that when I was messing about with the transparency control. It's like a ghost of the laundry appearing. Unfortunately the spirit of the inn refuses to appear !!

Drybrook Inn - around 1850

by Derek Bond @, Cheltenham, Sunday, January 31, 2021, 11:59 (310 days ago) @ probinson

Thanks for the map and information. On modern Google maps it looks like it might be: https://www.google.com/maps/place/51%C2%B051'48.1%22N+2%C2%B035'36.8%22W/@51.8631122,-2...

Drybrook Inn - around 1850

by sidtoomey01 @, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, Sunday, January 31, 2021, 05:54 (310 days ago) @ Derek Bond

Hi Derek,
I agree with Paul that the NLS Ordnance Survey Map he provided the link to, is the place where the Inn would have been.
One of the households in the Census is actually a "house upon wheels". Gypsies caravan perhaps ?
If so then the three households in the Census match the later published Ordnance Survey map.
I believe the Census Enumerator would have travelled along the road from South to North, based on previous and subsequent entries in the Census matching locations on the map.
My guess would be the larger property on the North side of the road.

Sid Toomey

Drybrook Inn - around 1850

by probinson @, S. Oxon, Sunday, January 31, 2021, 12:00 (310 days ago) @ sidtoomey01

Looking at subsequent census records doesn't really help but I would say definitely either the large building on the north side of the road or the one nearly opposite on the south side. Looking at them on street view I think the one on the south looks more like it might have been an inn but could be either.

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Peter

Drybrook Inn - around 1850

by Mike Pinchin @, Bedford, England, Sunday, January 31, 2021, 19:32 (310 days ago) @ probinson

BNA Ross Gazette - Thursday 28 August 1873 –

…………………………Mr. W. Sillett, of Goodrich, applied for a spirit and ale licence to be transferred or removed from a house at Drybrook called the Drybrook Inn, in the parish of Walford, to a house near the Kerne Bridge station of the Ross and Monmouth Railway, the said house being the property of John Partridge Esq.
Edward Jones, of the Albion lnn, Walford, opposed the application on the ground that his own alehouse was very close to the one Mr Sillett intended to open………………………………….


Despite the objection the application was granted, subject to formal confirmation by the County Commissioners. I presume this marks the demise of the Drybrook Inn.

Drybrook Inn - around 1850

by Derek Bond @, Cheltenham, Monday, February 01, 2021, 16:45 (309 days ago) @ Mike Pinchin

Thanks for the information. I too have been searching newspaper archives around the time when my third great grandfather George Taylor and his wife Elizabeth (nee Predeth) were landlord and landlady.
In 1847 William Lerigo appears to be the landlord but financial difficulties meant he had to assign his estate to Charles Weaver of Lydbrookin trust for himself and his creditors.
In 1848 an article talks about a road leading from the Drybrook Inn to a place called the Dam and thence to Ruardean, which belonged to Charles Matthew, a butcher, and was in a poor state of repair.
By 1851 George Taylor was the landlord. The inn served as a location for various auctions, of which one in 1854 stated that George Taylor would be showing the premises, being pasture, orchards, and woods at Oxlet in the parish of Walford.
In 1858 George was charged with having in his possession, four quart and eight-pint measures, deficient in quantity, for which he was fined £5 and expenses. In the same report Sophia Taylor, cider-house keeper, Walford, was charged with having three pints and one half-pint deficient in measure – fined £2 and 10s expenses. I am not sure if she was related to her. The inn had a club-room which was used by the Walford Union Friendly Society.
There are reports of its anniversaries in 1858 and 1866 where up to 150 members attended. In 1858 "The dinner was served up in Mr. and Mrs. Taylor’s usual style and gave great satisfaction. We need hardly say that the appetites of the members were much improved by the walk to church and back, which was evinced by the rapid disappearance of sundry well-cooked joints. After the removal of the cloth, numerous toasts were proposed and the evening spent in the usual manner".
In 1859 an article mentions a case of pig stealing against John Ball, butcher, English Bicknor and John Cooper and George Fox, shopkeepers, Gayford, held in the Magistrates room Coleford. James Griffith, a collier, once owned the pigs and he gained intelligence at Cat’s-hill turnpike-gate that they were missing. He went on to Mr. Taylor’s at Drybrook, near Kerne bridge, where he got further information from Mr. Taylor. Ann, wife of Richard Taylor, said: I live with my father-in-law at Drybrook, near Kerne bridge; he keeps a public-house called the Drybrook inn; on Thursday, 22nd September I went to see Temperance Dew, my sister-in-law, who lives about half a mile nearer Kerne bridge. Martha Powell said: I live as servant at the Drybrook inn; yesterday week I went to Mrs. Temperance Dew’s, and on returning I met Mrs. Taylor going up.
In 1867 there was a case of drunkenness against John Taylor, hawker, with being drunk and riotous at Walford. Police-constable Phillips had been called into the Drybrook Inn, where the defendant and another were fighting. Defendant was very drunk and quarrelsome. Apparently one witness Alfred Taylor deposed that he wrote the letter put in by the defendant at the former hearing; he wrote the letter by the direction of Mr Taylor, the landlord of the Drybrook Inn, who could not write himself…he had only written what Mr Taylor dictated.
In 1868 the license of the Drybrook Inn, Walford was transferred from George Taylor to John Hatton.
In 1859 Richard Wyson was charged with being drunk and refusing to leave a beerhouse during a club meeting when requested to do so by the landlord. The magistrate said, “It was a great pity that clubs of this description were held at public-houses, for when people got there, the drink flowed about like water, and thus the clubs were abused, and their members got themselves into a scrape”.
I think the writing was on the wall now because in 1873 Mr. W Sillett of Goodrich, applied for a spirit and ale license to be transferred or removed from a house at Drybrook called the Drybrook Inn, in the parish of Walford, to a house near the Kerne Bridge station of the Ross and Monmouth Railway”. There was opposition by Edward Jones of the Albion Inn, Walford because the alehouse was very close to his, however as Mr. Partridge had taken down a licensed beerhouse close by, called the Kerne Inn, the magistrate decided there would not be additional competition and granted the application.

Drybrook Inn - around 1850

by abird @, Monday, February 01, 2021, 00:08 (309 days ago) @ probinson

The one to the North is "Bishopswood Leigh" and the one to the south "Drybrook House" so I think it is more likely to be the one to the south.
It also appears on the 1861 census with the same people living there.

Adrian

Drybrook Inn - around 1850

by Derek Bond @, Cheltenham, Monday, February 01, 2021, 16:14 (309 days ago) @ abird

Thanks for the information - the only other information I found on location was a newspaper article dated 18-03-1848 which talks about the surveyor of Walford and a case concerning Charles Matthews, butcher of the parish, who refused to put a certain road into a proper state of affair leading from Drybrook Inn to a place called the Dam, and thence to Ruardean.

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